bakersnarkMDW
Didn’t take long for me to discover that Discord has a character limit on each post. While I guess that should discourage me, I figure I’ll just abuse the forum by using this topic to hold long texts for linking from Discord. Probably makes little sense doing it this way, but there it is.

Despite all this being couched in terms of “me” & “I”, this thread is for a purpose not a person, and anyone else with something to say that is more than Discord can handle should use this as the linkable repository of their ramblings.
Random item from my Tabletop Games Collection
[image] 
See it & the rest here:
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bakersnarkMDW
(Posted 6/6/19)
No doubt everyone was riveted by a little philosophical back and forth Benn and I had a couple of days ago here. Having got an existentialist rise out of Benn when I raised Schrödinger’s Cat in reference to breaking seals on games, and the relative meanings (or lack thereof) of words when deconstructed was mentioned, I saw an ever-so-tenuous opportunity to pop up a picture of a book whose title/author combo I find mildly amusing: Sense And Sensibilia by JL Austin. Benn took the whole thing WAY too seriously (as any good philosopher should), and the next thing I know he’s downloaded the text, skimmed some bits and is speculating which of his Existentialist buddies has got inside Mr Austin’s head. It’s made all the more difficult to determine because Austin’s work is reconstructed lecture material with no annotation, he having not got around to properly publishing his stuff due to a life of only 48 years with a little interruption called World War 2.
Anyway... my sleep patterns are all over the place at the moment so, as I was awake anyway, I decided have a stab at sourcing some information on Austin’s influences. There was some info on him to be found, the Wikipedia article was pretty good, but better still was material in the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy here:
https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/austin-jl/
Now Discord isn’t a great forum for long-winded writings, I’ll put something more comprehensive on the forums (yes, this is the short version folks), but there are a couple of non-philosophical items of interest I’d like to quickly share,
The first is particularly relevant to today’s date, from Stanford:
“During the Second World War, Austin served in the British Intelligence Corps. It has been said of him that, ‘he more than anybody was responsible for the life-saving accuracy of the D-Day intelligence’... He was honoured for his intelligence work with an Order of the British Empire, the French Croix de Guerre, and the U.S. Officer of the Legion of Merit.” A tidy little list of recognition!

The second is a simple stark sentence dangling at the end of a paragraph in the same article:
“He invented the card game CASE in 1951.”
That’s all the info provided and the only source mentioning it. Suddenly my tabletop-gamer sense was tingling! (No points for guessing where Spidey and I get those tingles). So, some more searching to zero in on CASE was an abject failure - the internet wasn’t the source of all knowledge! But what’s the alternative? I had to find a human head that might contain this info that hadn’t yet escaped onto the World Wide Web (does anyone [other than Spiderman] use that term any more? Perhaps Information Superhighway would be more current). So I emailed David Parlett!
Now some (most? all?) may not find much significance in that action, so I’ll explain. His importance in the board and card game world can be gleaned from his site https://www.parlettgames.uk but the two key things for me are:
He wrote the Penguin Encyclopaedia of Card Games (which I own and recommend), and he created the boardgame Hare & Tortoise (which I own and important Germans recommend):
“In 1979 the German edition ... became the first ever winner of the now prestigious Spiel des Jahres (Game of the Year) award.”
On his site he has a regular old direct email for contacting him, so I did. And waddaya know, he responded quite promptly. Unfortunately CASE was unknown to him and the most likely keeper of such knowledge (Michael Dummett) had died a few years earlier. He even responded to my follow up fanboy message - there was a bit of sucking up on my part but, I hasten to add, completely sincere. I might include the exchange when I write up the full version for the forum.
Ultimately, this largely pointless exercise was totally worth it for the legitimate excuse to contact Mr Parlett. Others may think nothing was worth the text deluge that just rained down on their heads. Too bad, I say, it was meaningful to me! And now Benn can question whether any of the words had any meaning at all.., 😁
Random item from my Tabletop Games Collection
[image] 
See it & the rest here:
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bennbanasik

Hmm. Ok, if we look at his contemporaries, which the Stanford link to his profile shows, there is definitely a wide engagement. Most are empiricists in the British analytical philosophical tradition. The exceptions and nuances presented at the lectures had to come as a reaction from these. It makes sense to then look to the Continental philosophical tradition that was popular of the time, just not so much in the academy of the US and Britain. There is little doubt he would have engaged with thinkers beyond Kant and Leibniz. What alerted me so abruptly is the comment on the back of the book, that there is an err in the tradition from Plato. That is Martin Buber's claim.

Page 128 of Sense and Sensibilia has his thoughts on accuracy and meaning. The pointers may be there, but something cannot be completely accurate. It seems from his short volume that he was somewhat of an existentialist. Sure, he didn't write as much as Derrida, but that doesn't necessarily matter.

TLDR: Philosophy is BAE.

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